Wednesday
Mar042015

When Use of my artwork goes horribly Wrong

 

 

Wednesday
Oct152014

Common conversation I have with well-meaning relatives:


"Hey Scott, is this your artwork on this t-shirt?
"No, that's Jack Kirby's art."
"Is he a friend of yours?"
"No, uh...no."
"What about this artwork? Is this yours?"
"No, that's John Romita's art."
"Do you know him?"
"No. All this stuff is classic Marvel art, from before I was born."
"Oh, okay. What about this?"
"John Buscema. He's dead."
"How can you tell who the artist is if there's no signature?"
"I just know from the style."
"Well I don't see a difference...what about this?"
"Yes! That one is mine, I think."
"You think?" 
"Well they make a lot of changes to stuff after I work on it..."
"You mean you can tell Jack Romita's work just by looking at it but you don't remember your own?"
"Jack Kir...sigh...yeah."

Friday
Jun132014

Ha! My Artwork is Vindicated!

HA! I am vindicated! Back in the ’90s, I worked for a screen printer doing custom artwork. After designing the illustration, I had to hand-stipple the color separations on sheets of vellum so they could burn the screens. (Seriously.) When I created this artwork to sell to the snowmobile market, a lady in the office criticized my art because “the moon is never that big” and “the moon isn’t that color.” Below is a photo of the actual printed sweatshirt that I’ve kept in my closet for the last 15 years. Also shown here is NASA’s “Astronomy Photo of the Day” taken last night over a town in Sweden. Ha! I say HA! to you, office lady who doubted me! (As a side note, this sweatshirt was a huge seller for the company, so I had already felt vindicated. But whatever. HA!)  :) 


        

Tuesday
May272014

Demo Video of me creating Spider-Man art

Here's a quick video of me doing some Spider-Man artwork

 

 

Wednesday
May142014

What is the difference between your Comics Experience Digital Painting course and their Comic Book Coloring Courses?

This morning I received an email from someone interested in taking a Comics Experience course, but wanted to know the differences between the comic book coloring class and my digital painting class.

 

Great question! Chris Sotomayor teaches 2 courses- Introduction to Comic Book Coloring and Advanced Comic Book Coloring. The course starting on June 5th is his Advanced class. If you are interested in being a comic book colorist I recommend taking both of these classes, as they are very specific to sequential art storytelling. His next Introduction to Comic Book Coloring course begins in September. If you have already taken his Intro class, his advanced class will continue the process of using color to tell a story and show you advanced rendering and special effects techniques. If you want more information about his class, feel free to contact Mr. Sotomayor and ask. I'm sure he will be excited to tell you about it!
 
My Introduction to Digital Painting course is a basic level class and is not specific to comic book pages or sequential art. Rather than teaching you how to color underneath inked line drawings, my class teaches you how to fully render an object so the viewer does not see the line drawing when you are finished. This technique can be applied to comic books, of course, but it has a much broader application than that. Book covers, Advertising, Concept Art, Licensed Merchandise, Matte Painting, Fine Art, Trading card games, and countless other areas. I do think it is a good class for comic book colorists who are interested in adding digital painting to their portfolio, though. 
In my class, I teach both basic art concepts (how to render objects by understanding light, shadow, color, and surface textures) that can be applied to any medium, as well as a heavy dose of computer techniques specific to creating digital art with the use of Photoshop and a pressure sensitive tablet.
 
Below are some examples of my own work, so you can see how it differs stylistically from comic book-style colored line art. I hope this helps! If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask.